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Picture of Eric
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That analogy was very intersting Brad. LOL, I have never heard it put quite like that.

You have posted some very good points in this forum.

Is this type of experience very desirable when it comes on very fast?

I guess it really depends on the person and the current psyche of that individual.

In some cases it appears to be out of the individual's control.

Some times the stories I read are really hard to follow. It really is hard to put the experience into writting. It is just so perplexing that there are such contrasting differences.

I have heard Kundalini, the Holy Spirit, enlightenment, The Virgin Mary, spirit guides, energy forces etc. etc. The list goes on.

What is one to conclude with all this? Is it really desirable? I personally feel that if it is full of love and if you have your heart set on God then it is pretty safe. Especially the ones that appear to be from a gift of grace.

All in all, I think slow and steady is the best route for any person. The whole experience can be a nightmare if it is not respected. Because there are things that can possibly be done to accelerate the process. Although it can get quite out of control if you don't know what you are doing. As I have experienced.
 
Posts: 470 | Location: Greensboro, NC | Registered: 05 February 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Eric
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But, the biggest question is how the heck do I get an avatar? I am having a technical problem trying to get one. I put a pic on my profile but it won't show up as an avatar. A technical forum section wouldn't be a bad suggestion.
 
Posts: 470 | Location: Greensboro, NC | Registered: 05 February 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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But, the biggest question is how the heck do I get an avatar? I am having a technical problem trying to get one. I put a pic on my profile but it won't show up as an avatar. A technical forum section wouldn't be a bad suggestion.

Okay, I�ve tried changing mine. In the past I know that it sometimes took a while before it would show up. I don�t know if this has to do with the browser�s cache or not. Eric, after you�re done fiddling with your profile be sure to hit the little button at the bottom that says "Update Profile". It looks to me like that would be an easy button to miss.

Okay, so far I can�t get my new avatar to show but I�m going to give it some time.

All in all, I think slow and steady is the best route for any person. The whole experience can be a nightmare if it is not respected. Because there are things that can possibly be done to accelerate the process. Although it can get quite out of control if you don't know what you are doing. As I have experienced.

I think what becomes particularly useful and instructive, Eric, is if there are a number of people, of various personalities (such as you and me for starters), who give accounts of whatever struggles and triumphs they are undergoing. I have no doubt that what is best for some is a bolt of lightning and for others it is a slow simmer. On the other hand, "slow simmer" is potentially a coward�s excuse not to jump in with both feet. (Mea culpa.) Smiler And the down side to the bolt of lightning approach is that there could be some serious letdowns if one thinks that their hair should always be standing on end. Wink

I personally feel that if it is full of love and if you have your heart set on God then it is pretty safe. Especially the ones that appear to be from a gift of grace.

I really doubt that a more succinct formalization could be given.

Again, thanks for your advice.
 
Posts: 5413 | Location: Washington State | Registered: 21 September 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Eric
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Ok. For some strange reason I never had an Avatar option in my profile. I have checked a dozen times. Now for some reason there is one. Thank you who ever fixed that.
 
Posts: 470 | Location: Greensboro, NC | Registered: 05 February 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Eric
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Aha. I have member status now. Before I was a junior member. That must be the case. You can't have an avatar if you are a junior member. Now that I see my ugly mug I am not so sure if I want an avatar. LOL
 
Posts: 470 | Location: Greensboro, NC | Registered: 05 February 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Now that I see my ugly mug I am not so sure if I want an avatar.

Nonsense. Terri, tell this guy how handsome he is. I can�t do it myself because that sort of thing just isn�t done. If a guy did such a thing it could lead to all sorts of other things like us complimenting each other on what we�re wearing, discussing male hygiene problems or � gads! � talking about our feelings. Society as we know it would break down!
 
Posts: 5413 | Location: Washington State | Registered: 21 September 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Eric
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I have evolved past the testosterone induced rages and primitive male grunting. What is society to do with me?
 
Posts: 470 | Location: Greensboro, NC | Registered: 05 February 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have evolved past the testosterone induced rages and primitive male grunting.

Have pity on us males. Testosterone is such a powerful drug. It is as if we were wandering around all day in a mild form of a PCP-induced state of violent rapture.

But what I really came here to say today about transformation -- in particular, mine -- was that it is a singular challenge for us single people to find purpose without many of the normal guideposts such as marriage and children. This can lead to many unique opportunities for learning and for gaining new perspectives, but it can come at a terrible cost. Anyone with a wife and children, and the concomitant responsibilities, knows that there is no shortage of opportunities for learning, growth and new perspectives in such an arrangement. As human beings, we need no singular circumstance apart from marriage and children in order to grow. They are enough. And yet we find that outside of such things there are circumstances that cause us to learn and grow.

But I have no fear (or not as much). A couple days ago my five-year-old nephew dropped by the office and I took some time to play some video games with him on the computer. Later, he asked me to glue together some scraps of paper in order to make a "book", which I gladly did. When handing him this book he looked at me and asked if I had a wife. I said no. He then asked if I had any kids. Again, I said no. And then (and it�s kind of hard to believe that a five-year-old can show this kind of complex compassion) he quickly inserted something like "Oh, I mean any kids besides me!" And then he also pointed out that I also had his younger brother who was recently born.
 
Posts: 5413 | Location: Washington State | Registered: 21 September 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Eric
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Once, I was talking to my 7 year old sister-in-law. I asked her if she knew what the capital of Maryland was and she looked at me with a smile on her face and said, "Capital M, Silly".
 
Posts: 470 | Location: Greensboro, NC | Registered: 05 February 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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LOL. Oh, that�s a good one, Eric.

There�s been a lot of discussion around these forums lately about contemplation, meditation, and ways to find a deeper peace. I�ve discovered that I have a particular kind of peace and I doubt I�m the only one who has it. It can hardly be rare or unique since it seems to be so easy to fall into. I call it Zip-a-dee-doo-dah peace (patent pending). It�s a peace that is good, smooth and reliable as long as there is "plenty of sunshine headin� my way." Don�t laugh. Finding some kind of peace in between traumatic events is no small accomplishment.
 
Posts: 5413 | Location: Washington State | Registered: 21 September 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Eric
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Brad, how can you patent peace? LOL

It seems that you have found a joy within that you can tune into when you need it. We all have it but tuning appears to be the hard part. There are so many frequencies trying to distract us everyday. Sometimes the best ones are so silent it is hard to hear them with all the "clutter" or "background noise".

I think little children are enlightened. It is us adults who need to learn from them not the other way around.
 
Posts: 470 | Location: Greensboro, NC | Registered: 05 February 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Brad's not mentioning the role of 20 oz. fat-free hot chocolates, but we're onto him. Wink

. . . it is a singular challenge for us single people to find purpose without many of the normal guideposts such as marriage and children. . .

. . . and separation, divorce, and re-singled. So there ya go! Big Grin

Sounds like that nephew of yours likes his Uncle Brad! Wink
 
Posts: 7539 | Location: Wichita, KS | Registered: 09 August 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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he he he he. "Don't laugh. Finding some kind of peace inbetween traumatic events is some kind of accomplishment."

I agree Brad. I loved it. This transformation business is hard work, delightful, joyous, exhausting, exhilarating, - you get my drift? Those quiet moments of peace inbetween are pure gift! And I would not change a moment of it. (Except when I am in the midst of one that is not gentle, not gentle by any stretch of the imagination, but still good!)
 
Posts: 40 | Location: Minnesota | Registered: 16 January 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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. . . and separation, divorce, and re-singled. So there ya go!

My brother looked at me the other day after receiving the umpteenth call from his wife during the day and said, "Brad, you definitely aren't made for this." He's probably right, Phil. Maybe I've been spared the pain of separation, divorce, re-singling, and perhaps separation/divorce/re-singling again -- and perhaps again -- as happens to so many.

Sounds like that nephew of yours likes his Uncle Brad!

Yes, he's an extraordinary fellow. He's able to draw out of me whatever love that exists.

This transformation business is hard work, delightful, joyous, exhausting, exhilarating, - you get my drift?

I get your drift, Diane, and I think this transformation business is all that and it challenges our imagination. We all have set ideas of who we are and how the world works, and if we're honest, we'll admit to the fact that much of it is wrong and needlessly limiting. Imagination (and I would say some type of faith as well) is needed to transcend our tired little boxes that we've put ourselves into.
 
Posts: 5413 | Location: Washington State | Registered: 21 September 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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For the past couple weeks or so I've been pressing pretty hard for some answers. This recent bout was triggered when I was unexpectedly given the answer to a vexing problem, and honestly, so many thoughts have passed between then and now that I don't remember what it was. (I'll link you to some of those thoughts if I feel brave enough. But they are a pretty rough read.)

I've undergone, or tried to undergo, or assented to, or some mixture of the above, a personal upheaval. It was to separate some of the wheat from the chaff, to blow away some of the more useless bits, to set a few delusions loose on the breeze, and to test some intellectual and spiritual limits, as well as to stretch them. There were some casualties. My narcissism took a definite hit. Same with my arrogance and self-centeredness. What is left is by no means just pure wheat for I will undoubtedly be upset and sifted many times over in the future. But as always I was looking for the answer � whatever that is � and probably too earnestly, but like I said, I simply assented to this desire to see where it would lead me.

At some point in the past I jumped off life's tract and I haven't been able to get myself back on since. That's what it feels like. I'm not expecting a three-ring circus of parties, life on the Riviera, Girls Gone Wild every night, fancy cars, fancy clothes, fame, honors, luxuries, etc., etc., etc. I'm just looking for a sense of purpose and peace. And I think I really do want to share my life with someone, but first, it seems, I have to find that life. But I know that there is a track for me as sure as the beautiful sun shines warmly on my face at the moment. There is a track for me where things make sense.

It's just a matter of finding it. I feel like my experience and what knowledge I have are all funneling towards something. I can feel it in my bones. I've been almost nowhere, lived almost nothing, and really know so few and have loved so little, but still somehow I have been given knowledge beyond my experience, reason and worthiness. I think that I am meant to help people but I don't know how when I feel I haven't been able to do so thus far. I feel like I've only been an instrument of confusion and pain. But I�m not seeking perfection. I'm only seeking to get back on a track where life makes some kind of sense.

Obviously I've had many failed attempts trying to get on track, but then I finally discovered that, quite literally, and with the least, if any, faith, that I was not the best conductor and that their was a better one. For all I know my "on track" life could consist of nothing but a painful search for the track (sort of like I�m doing now). That would be brutal but it's certainly possible. But I've experienced enough changes and insights in the last two weeks that I'm not too afraid of staying in a rut. But I'm probably in for a shock in that, although there is some damage that can, has, and will be repaired, short of a brain transplant I'm still likely going to be substantially me. Most of my problems probably stem from trying to chase normal. Well, self-acceptance truly ain't a river in Egypt either. Wink

What's hard sometimes is the loneliness and the feelings of isolation. I've got a masters degree in that, although I think many others unfortunately have their doctorate. But I'm an idealist. That seems to be the same thing as saying that I am prone to grand, but still false, delusions. I want things and imagine things that don't seem possible or realistic. I don't know, frankly, what is possible and reasonable and what is not, and so far I haven't quite found those in real life (thank god for the net) who can sort of share my outlook on life. I've certainly tried squelching or changing myself to perhaps be more acceptable or appealing to others but that has lead to the worst kind of misery. Sometimes it feels like I can either have my lonely ideals or the miserable company of reality.

Outside of books I know that it is sort of rare to read such thoughts and feelings so I just want to assure you that I'm feeling pretty good right now. I've never been afraid to face any of this stuff and would gladly endure almost any kind of psychological pain if I thought it was on the road to a better life. I can hardly stand the site of blood but my pain threshold for this kind of stuff is rather high. If somebody else were saying this stuff you should probably call 911 but you're talking to an artist whose passion is the written word and some of the best material for the written word is life's struggles. But I long to write about life's joys as well. They get swamped sometimes by this other stuff. But we all have our joys and they are good to share too�but it's sort of surprising how relatively little of that we do sometimes.

Now, to conclude this little narcissistic dialogue properly, I'd like to thank a number of people for their help. But I don't want to name the names of all those who have helped. There have been so many and it would take too long. Let me just list the people who haven't helped:
 
Posts: 5413 | Location: Washington State | Registered: 21 September 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of jk1962
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For all I know my "on track" life could consist of nothing but a painful search for the track (sort of like I�m doing now). That would be brutal but it's certainly possible.

What would be worse would be if you never knew the pain of the search, my friend. I'm a real advocate of there being purpose in pain (not to an extreme, of course, but in the normal realm of finding out who we are). And, FWIW, though I do know who I am, the track still lays ahead of me, and I find myself uncovering new parts of who I am periodically. It's good for me..it shakes me up and keeps me from languishing (I have a tendency to do that if things are all sorted out all the time).

Anyway, as always, it was a pleasure to read your forthright and honest post..I love those Smiler .

Blessings,
Terri
 
Posts: 609 | Location: Oklahoma | Registered: 27 April 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Anyway, as always, it was a pleasure to read your forthright and honest post..I love those

I am very glad that it is a pleasure, Terri. It�s certainly a pleasure to write it. And dumb and stupid as this may sound, it wouldn�t be much of a pleasure at all if I didn�t have people like you to read it with a frank but understanding heart, not afraid to disagree and state your own opinion, but still able to pull the punches when you sense that someone is bleedin� a bit too much.

It's good for me..it shakes me up and keeps me from languishing (I have a tendency to do that if things are all sorted out all the time).

Oh, you make languishing sound so good that I want to make that my life�s goal. Smiler To languish. Sounds wonderfully non-stressful and relaxing. With a cup of tea and a good book one would be all set. But do you also think, Terri, that there are times we might push ourselves out of peace because we think we should be progressing or doing something? I find that a tough balance to get a grip on. When am I floating and when am I simply doing what this body, mind and spirit should be doing and that is soaking in the goodness as one finds it?
 
Posts: 5413 | Location: Washington State | Registered: 21 September 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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lol..well what I meant by languish would be that part of the definition that says:

1. To become weak; droop.

The irony is that if I do languish, I find myself stressed because I KNOW I'm languishing and I have a real thing about being "weak"..one of those personal little idiosyncrasies I suppose. Not that we aren't all weak in some respect, but for me it's the whole weakness of mind and spirit moreso than any type of physical weakness...know what I mean? Or did that make no sense at all Razzer Which, I believe, addresses your question of:

But do you also think, Terri, that there are times we might push ourselves out of peace because we think we should be progressing or doing something?

Absolutely, positively. And it IS a tough balance sometimes. Personally, in the immediate sense, the times it is toughest is when I know I have things I need to accomplish or lots on my schedule or that nagging feeling that I've forgotten to take care of something that's important and will come back to bite me. In the long-range sense, it's those things that concern the future of the family and how we'll handle certain things and just what unwelcome surprises can come along :-|.

You know when I'm really the most peaceful? It's when I'm doing hard work, preferrably at the crack of dawn, and just concentrating on all of creation around me. Or...in the middle of a crashing thunderstorm with a cup of coffee watching it on my back porch..lol. Maybe that's just the country in me Wink .

There's a tremendous amount to be said for "soaking in the goodness as one finds it." Here I go with another commencement address goody, but bear with me. This was at my daughter's HS graduation, and their speaker was the baseball coach. He's a terrific, sensitive kind of guy who faced a real trauma late last year when he was involved in a car accident that cost the life of a woman. He rear-ended them in a construction zone...accident, of course, but you can imagine the guilt. In the last of his commencement address he encouraged everyone to make a list of daily "little miracles" that they wanted to see or experience or had seen and experienced. For instance, the first one was to look outside and see the miracle of the daybreak...and smile. The second one was to make sure you said hello and smiled at someone on the street because it just might be THEIR miracle of the day. To laugh..to make someone laugh..to hug someone...to read some little inspirational quote...etc. His focus was actually what you mentioned there...look for and soak in the goodness that comes your way every single day, even if it's been mundane to you for years, see the beauty of it.

There's a time for pushing, to be sure, but I think sometimes we forget the floating.

Blessings,
Terri
 
Posts: 609 | Location: Oklahoma | Registered: 27 April 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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1. To become weak; droop.

You�re right, Terri. My definition wasn�t quite right. But I�ve yet to dig a hole for myself so deep that I couldn�t fudge my way out of it. Which is to say, I love drooping into a nice, comfortable chair with a book and a glass of iced tea.

Not that we aren't all weak in some respect, but for me it's the whole weakness of mind and spirit moreso than any type of physical weakness...know what I mean?

I know what you mean.

You know when I'm really the most peaceful? It's when I'm doing hard work, preferrably at the crack of dawn, and just concentrating on all of creation around me.

You�ve just shot to hell all plans I had of moving to Oklahoma. You people work too hard. But my hat is off to you. In fact, go ahead and take it to shade your head while you�re out there workin� in the sun. Don�t mind me. I�ll be languishing in this here chair. If it bothers you to see me like this then I�d be glad to languish on the other side of the barn. People such as you make me feel like that other word that I�m not quite as fond of�

quote:
Lazy: apathetic, bum, careless, comatose, dallying, dilatory, drowsy, dull, flagging, heavy-footed, idle, inattentive, indifferent, indolent, inert, lackadaisical, laggard, lagging, languid, languorous, lethargic, lifeless, loafing, neglectful, passive, procrastinating, remiss, sack artist, shiftless, slack, sleepy, slothful, slow, slow-moving, snoozy, somnolent, supine, tardy, tired, torpid, trifling, unconcerned, unenergetic, unindustrious, unpersevering, unready, wear
Next to that, languish is downright hard-working:

quote:
Languish: be disregarded, be neglected, become dull, brood, burn out, conk out, decline, desire, despond, deteriorate, dwindle, fade, fag, fag out, fail, faint, fizzle out, flag, go soft, grieve, hanker, hunger, knock out, long, peg out, peter out, pine, poop, poop out, repine, rot, sicken, sigh, snivel, sorrow, suffer, tucker, tucker out, waste, waste away, weaken, wilt, wither, yearn
I still say that a lot of those definitions sound like a comfortable lie in the shade. (Peg out? Mmm. Wilt. Ahhhh. I�ll wipe that cold glass of tea across my forehead.)

To laugh..to make someone laugh.

I hope I did that. And what another great story. A remarkable man.

Blessings

That you are.
 
Posts: 5413 | Location: Washington State | Registered: 21 September 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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You people work too hard. But my hat is off to you.

Ah...you can put it back on, we don't work THAT hard! Seriously, compared to what our fathers did?...pffffft..we got it eaassyy.

Don�t mind me. I�ll be languishing in this here chair. If it bothers you to see me like this then I�d be glad to languish on the other side of the barn.

Now see, here's the beauty of the thing. When everyone works together, we all get to languish for just a bit in the chair by the barn. And being on the other side of the barn won't save ya...muwahaha.

To laugh..to make someone laugh.

I hope I did that.


Rest assured...you did Big Grin

And you are a blessing as well!

Terri
 
Posts: 609 | Location: Oklahoma | Registered: 27 April 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Ah...you can put it back on, we don't work THAT hard![

Aha! So you guys over there are Texas wannabes, are ya? Always trying to make some story sound bigger than it is. But on second thought, I have little doubt that they picked up that Big Sky attitude from you guys. It must sort of obey gravity and dribble down there from the north. I didn�t know that until know. You Okies are kind of a best-kept secret, and if you want my advice, I�d sort of keep it that way. Big Grin

But all regional kidding aside (Psssst. No, Brad�Okies really are like that). Oh�well, as I was saying. Whenever you Okies feel like a trip to the northwest just remember that to find it you head due east. Can�t miss it. Just after the Carolinas.

Now see, here's the beauty of the thing. When everyone works together, we all get to languish for just a bit in the chair by the barn.

I really like that picture in my head of a good ol� fashioned neighbor-helping-neighbor barn raising. Some older members of my family have long told stories of the help people would give each other trying to get those crops in fast before they spoiled (North Dakota stories). I truly believe that things like that are missing from city life. City life offers some unique benefits indeed, but may we never become so smart and sophisticated to forget (or be ashamed to remember) just how wonderful the land is at shaping people�.uh, maybe except for in Oklahoma. Oh, stop it. ESPECIALLY in Oklahoma.
 
Posts: 5413 | Location: Washington State | Registered: 21 September 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Around here we really do still do the neighbor-helping-neighbor routine. Like...if a farmer dies, then the others around pitch in and plow his fields or help with the harvest or whatever so that the family doesn't have to think about it. Or...a couple years ago when we were making some drastic changes in our farming, a neighbor farmer just dropped on over to one of our places and started plowing it...fertilized it too, btw. It is definitely one of those things that warms my heart whenever it comes around (which is fairly often). It's just a way of life...hate to sound cliche' here, but it's true. I tried the city thing, and for me it didn't work, but there are lots of folks who leave here for the city and love it. Just all depends on the people, I suppose Smiler .

The older members of your family have some really cool things to tell, I bet. I used to love listening to my mom and dad relate those kinds of stories. You need to write it all down. I could kick myself because I didn't preserve the stories my folks told. Loooots of history in those old stories.

Blessings,
Terri
 
Posts: 609 | Location: Oklahoma | Registered: 27 April 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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It's just a way of life...hate to sound cliche' here, but it's true. I tried the city thing, and for me it didn't work, but there are lots of folks who leave here for the city and love it. Just all depends on the people, I suppose.

Living in a city of about 39,000, I guess makes my situation sort of a tweener. The country is surely not far, and you can get a real taste of it right around the bend, but it's not like miles and miles of open corn rows or something (which I think is just beautiful�I never fail to tear up when watching Field of Dreams). And unfortunately it's still too big to get that small-town feel and too small to get some of the pay-offs of living like a trapped rat in a concrete jungle such as large art museums and such (but that's only a short ferry ride away in Seattle). But if you saw our mountains, our water and our trees you would know that I'm just a pessimist looking for things to complain about. Short of New Zealand, Hawaii or, if you simply must have warm weather, something like California, then this is one of the most beautiful and varied regions in the world. And being a wannabe geologist at one point I'm not kidding. This place has a little bit of everything. Tall, tall mountains. Volcanos. Large rivers. Lots of open water, both fresh and salt water. Forests. Farmland. Desert. Coulees. Rainforests. Islands. Orcas. Whales. Salmon. And, errr, rain. Lots and lots of rain. And lots and lots of gray skies. Which is one reason I have to give this huge Chamber of Commerce-like pitch just to convince you we're not all sitting around like statues covered in ash from Mt. St. Helens, unable to move because the ash was soaked by rain and then solidified in a freak accident when this big round orangy thing suddenly appeared in the sky and dried us solid. By the way, I'm typing this now via fancy voice recognition software. I can't move my arms or my legs, but really, it's only because I ate some bad shellfish. Has nothing to do with the rain. But thank goodness those smart Microsoft programmers are nearby.

I loved your reflections on country living, Terri. I really do think I would have loved growing up in Mayberry or on a farm. Wouldn't want to do all that hard work, but I suppose it's worth it sometimes.
 
Posts: 5413 | Location: Washington State | Registered: 21 September 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Where you live sounds great! My aunt lives in Vancouver, so I've seen some of the scenery from her place, and my late sis used to live at Bremerton...she was a picture NUT! It is beautiful country up there. I do have to say that I still always tell people that living in San Diego gave me a taste of what I consider to be one of the greatest places geographically and climatically speaking in the country. There was that really cool aspect of being able to go 30 miles east and go up into the mountains to snow or go 5 miles to the west and be in the ocean...wonderful.

Dang...your voice recognition works better than mine. But then I haven't worked with it just a whole lot. And don't you know what's in the water?!?..gotta watch those shellfish Razzer .

Oh oh..that makes me think. If you can get someone to tape them, have them tape the "Deadliest Catch" series that's going on now on the Discovery channel. Talk about dangerous, tricky, and incredibly trying work!..whew. It's about crab fishermen. I'm not sure how many shows are going to be in the series, but I've already watched probably 5 or 6 of them.

I think you would have loved the farm. All of us get tired of the work, the stress of watching the weather, and the hot dry summers, but the positives outweigh that a lot. One thing I have loved about being married to a farmer is that when the children were all home and old enough, we all worked together. There's something very cementing about that. And there's all kinds of fun things to do to make it not quite so "blah" for them. I can remember taking picnic lunches complete with tablecloth to spread in the field...lol. Or..taking marshmallows and weiners to roast after cleaning up all the sticks that would blow out of the trees..kinda like the final victory over your enemy when you get to roast marshmallows over its flames..LOL! And I've lost count of how many critters they've jumped off the tractor to chase and capture and bring home to show me..or try to keep. So, it is worth it..very much so Wink .

Um..we kinda got sidetracked on your thread here didn't we Razzer ..sorry bout that.

Blessings,
Terri
 
Posts: 609 | Location: Oklahoma | Registered: 27 April 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Um..we kinda got sidetracked on your thread here didn't we ..sorry bout that.

I'm not buying that cover story one bit, Terri. But really, I have to agree, even if your ways are kind of sneaky. Even if I get this "Oh, sorry about misdirecting this thread with lil ol' me ramblin' on about heaven on earth and tractors turning the dirt". Which reminds me. Unless people buy and pot their own flowers, in the city it's possible to go months, if not years, without getting dirt under one's fingernails. That can't be healthy. Oh, we'll get lots of other things under there like white-out and maybe a little cement dust from climbing the walls in this concrete jungle. But to feel and smell the earth, to see them critters, as you say, scampering around and sort of reminding us that our order they do not see nor do they recognize. No, Terri. You can't hijack or misdirect this thread with stories of life of our dependence on nature, of friend helping friend, of skies so big and blue you feel the earth really is flat because surely the whole world must be spread out before you. I honestly can not think of any better transformation right now than being transformed from an urbanite to a cow-patty-jumper.

Misdirect this thread, Virginia, errr, I mean, Terri? No. This thread exists for farmers as certainly as love and generosity and devotion to 4 a.m. milkings exits. Alas, how dreary would this thread be if there were no Sanka crops. (Uhhhhh�you know�growing coffee beans in the fields.)

They joy of hearing someone tell of their loves is truly transformational no matter where it is done.
 
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