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New findings on avoiding Alzheimer's Login/Join
 
<w.c.>
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That's cool! I noticed this link in a sidebar to the article above. I've been drinking red wine regularly for several years now -- mostly for heart benefits, but I've actually come to enjoy it with my dinner as well.
 
Posts: 7539 | Location: Wichita, KS | Registered: 09 August 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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God made grapes for a reason! Smiler Beer has also been known to produce many health benefits.

I used to be a somalier, and had an educated palate
and knew all about the wine regions in France and Germany, but alas, I echo Ringo Star:

"No, no, no no, I don't drink it no more,

I'm tired of waking up on the floor.

No thank you please, it only makes me sneeze,

And then it makes it hard to find the door!" Smiler


Everything in immoderation is my credo. One is too many, but fifty are not enough. Had to get out of the vino business, but appreciate it as an institution. It's just an institution that might
land a guy like me in some other kind of institution. Frowner Have one for me, too, Phil. Smiler
 
Posts: 2559 | Registered: 14 June 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
<w.c.>
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More encouragement from animal studies on preservation/recovery of memory capacity with the herb Bacopa:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/en...=16053272&query_hl=1
 
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<w.c.>
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<w.c.>
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<w.c.>
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Good article covering various benefits of nutrients for brain health:


http://www.lef.org/protocols/prtcl-003.shtml
 
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<w.c.>
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<w.c.>
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Here's an herb that is often used in Ayurvedic medicine for support of mental function that has shown benefits for the recovery or enhancement of short-term memory. This latest bit of research shows its ability to prevent amyloid beta, or brain plaque, which would make it a good addition to curcumin, as Bacopa seems to require small amounts, perhaps even one capsule per day:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/en...&itool=pubmed_docsum
 
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<w.c.>
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More mainstream, media-reported medical research showing turmeric to prevent Alzheimer's disease:


http://abcnews.go.com/Health/wireStory?id=2608179
 
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I thought this was an interesting review of the disease by a professor of geography:

http://www.hdfoster.com/Foster_Alzheimers.pdf

It looks at vitamin and dietary issues in particular.
 
Posts: 18 | Registered: 13 September 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
<w.c.>
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Thanks for that link.
 
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<w.c.>
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Research re: Anti-Alzheimer's diet:


http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/id/QAA400096
 
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<HeartPrayer>
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WC: That�s a fascinating link that�s being suggested between Diabetes and Alzheimers.

I just saw some astonishingly negative statistics on Diabetes. Apparently the growing Diabetes rates are outpacing even the most pessimistic prognoses.

And last week my wife and I watched a frightening TV program on the sugar industry. It does seem slavery is alive and well in the 21st century.

By the way, did you know that the Church of England once owned some of the largest sugar plantations in the Carribean? The Archbishop of Canterbury was on the board of directors. And, no, the church didn�t lift a finger to do anything about slavery.

What was just as frightening was the incredible power of the sugar lobby in the USA; and they�re definitely effective in UN forums as well. The sugar lobby and US representatives made it very difficult, indeed, for formen Norwegian Prime Minister and head of the World Health Organisation to implement sugar-reduction measures.

Perhaps if someone could construe an Al Qaeda connection... Then we could convince the authorities that high sugar intakes through soft drinks and cereals are actually a vile terrorist plot to claim far higher casualties than 9/11!

Then we just might get some serious measures implemented and the required resources invested in combating this sweet Network of Evil...

Wink

With best regards,
HeartPrayer


PS. Michael & Phil: Let�s raise a toast to moderation, then.
 
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Perhaps if someone could construe an Al Qaeda connection... Then we could convince the authorities that high sugar intakes through soft drinks and cereals are actually a vile terrorist plot to claim far higher casualties than 9/11!

Cigarette smoking and drunk driving already causes many, many more deaths each year than 9/11, only they don't disrupt the culture nearly so much.

I think for so many of these nutrition-related issues, change will come moreso from consumer purchasing decisions than government policies. That will most likely be the case with sugar, which has many legitimate uses, and would be difficult to regulare.
 
Posts: 7539 | Location: Wichita, KS | Registered: 09 August 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
<w.c.>
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Yes, too much regulation could easily bleed over into nutricueticals for instance, as is the case with CODEX lobbying and the European legal measures combating it toward protecting consumer rights re: vitamins, minerals, herbs, etc . . . Perhaps . . . . better the devil you know that some new government entity that requires years to expose. .
 
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<HeartPrayer>
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quote:
Originally posted by Phil:
[qb]Cigarette smoking and drunk driving already causes many, many more deaths each year than 9/11, only they don't disrupt the culture nearly so much.[/qb]
Methinks sometimes they do. On the other hand, since they have been with us so long, we don�t realise that. In our mind�s eye we fail to see the catastrophes that happen on a slower time scale.

It�s a bit like putting a frog into hot water: it jumps out. But if you heat a pot of water slowly, it will die, not having the sense to escape its worsening predicament.

And so it is with our health � not only our individual health, but the true health of society and the nation.
 
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Right, there's no doubting the strain on a culture from cigarette smoking, alcoholism, obesity, etc. As you note, it's been with us for centuries and we've gotten used to it.

The difference with terrorism is that one well-placed nuke detonated (along with the threat to do more) would pretty much destroy not only many lives, but the economic and social infrastructure that makes it possible for a culture to deal with its many problems. Hence, the type of response called for -- primarily preventative measures -- is more critical. Kind of hard to compare these things side-by-side, imo.
 
Posts: 7539 | Location: Wichita, KS | Registered: 09 August 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
<HeartPrayer>
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quote:
Originally posted by w.c.:
[qb]The usual notion of genetic influence in most diseases appears over-simplified...[/qb]
The way that I�ve always understood it is this:
You inherit a tendency. Generally. Unless the ailment or condition is congenital, i.e. present from birth.

Otherwise it is, indeed, very meaningful to talk about risk reducing measures, alleviating factors, treatment etc. Basically we�re talking about a complex set of correlating factors, not pure cause and effect. (In other words, it is to some extent like a lottery, but we can do many things to significantly change the odds to our advantage.)

Have I understood this correctly, WC?
 
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